Im leyla, im in colorado, and im 16 :p
lemmeupgradeu:

Only Rihanna could wear what looks like a tea towel and still be this sexy.

lemmeupgradeu:

Only Rihanna could wear what looks like a tea towel and still be this sexy.

chiinky:

This pic is always relevant..

chiinky:

This pic is always relevant..

golddiggerr:

http://instagram.com/Msivana_

golddiggerr:

http://instagram.com/Msivana_

cali-girls-do-it-better:

http://cali-girls-do-it-better.tumblr.com/

cali-girls-do-it-better:

http://cali-girls-do-it-better.tumblr.com/

the-absolute-best-posts:

Featured on a 1000Notes.com blog

the-absolute-best-posts:

Featured on a 1000Notes.com blog

the-absolute-best-posts:

elf-in-mirror:

This right here, ladies and gentlemen, just might be the best beauty-and-beast-story ever.

Because any little girl (or boy for that matter) should grow up knowing that you could be a giant green ogre, and you’d still be bloody gorgeous to the ones that matter.  And not in the “oh, I can overlook your flaws” -kind of way. But in the “those aren’t flaws, they are beauty spots!”-kind of way.

Featured on a 1000Notes.com blog

It always creeps me out…

frontyardigan:

therealeovaldez:

phoneticfrenetic:

crowley-for-king:

…that no matter

image

how close

image

you get

image

the pupil

image

seems to

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devour light

image

like a black hole

image

it reflects no light

That’s because the pupil is literally a hole in the iris that lets light enter the retina. No light is reflected by the pupil because it is either absorbed directly into the tissues of the eye, or it is absorbed after it is refracted around the inside of the eye.

Then black holes are merely the eyes of the universe

Whoa


Watermelon snow, also called snow algae, red snow, or blood snow, is Chlamydomonas nivalis, a species of green algae containing a secondary red carotenoid pigment in addition to chlorophyll. This phenomenon is especially common during the summer months in the Sierra Nevada of California where snow has lingered from winter storms, mainly at altitudes of 10,000 to 12,000 feet. Compressing the snow with your boot leaves a distinct footprint the color of watermelon pulp. The snow even has a fresh watermelon scent.
Photo credit:  © Michal Renee

Watermelon snow, also called snow algae, red snow, or blood snow, is Chlamydomonas nivalis, a species of green algae containing a secondary red carotenoid pigment in addition to chlorophyll. This phenomenon is especially common during the summer months in the Sierra Nevada of California where snow has lingered from winter storms, mainly at altitudes of 10,000 to 12,000 feet. Compressing the snow with your boot leaves a distinct footprint the color of watermelon pulp. The snow even has a fresh watermelon scent.

Photo credit: © Michal Renee